Indian Stock Market

By Aakash 12 Comments 15 Sept 2018
Stock Market

An Overview

The overall responsibility of development, regulation and supervision of the stock market rests with the Securities & Exchange Board of India (SEBI), which was formed in 1992 as an independent authority. Since then, SEBI has consistently tried to lay down market rules in line with the best market practices. It enjoys vast powers of imposing penalties on market participants, in case of a breach.





BSE & NSE

Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) and the National Stock Exchange (NSE) most of the trading in the Indian stock market takes place on this two stock exchanges. The BSE has been in existence since 1875. On the other hand, The NSE was founded in 1992 and started trading in 1994. However, both exchanges follow the same trading mechanism, trading hours, settlement process, etc. At the last count, the BSE had about 4,700 listed firms, whereas the rival NSE had about 1,200. Out of all the listed firms on the BSE, only about 500 firms constitute more than 90% of its market capitalisation; the rest of the crowd consists of highly illiquid shares.

Almost all the significant firms of India are listed on both the exchanges. NSE enjoys a dominant share in spot trading, with about 70% of the market share and almost a complete monopoly in derivatives trading, with about a 98% share in this market, as of 2009. Both exchanges compete for the order flow that leads to reduced costs, market efficiency and innovation.

Trading Mechanism

Trading Mechanism

Trading at both the exchanges takes place through an open electronic limit order book, in which order matching is done by the trading computer. There are no market makers or specialists and the entire process is order-driven, which means that market orders placed by investors are automatically matched with the best limit orders. As a result, buyers and sellers remain anonymous. The advantage of an order driven market is that it brings more transparency, by displaying all buy and sell orders in the trading system. However, in the absence of market makers, there is no guarantee that orders will be executed. All orders in the trading system need to be placed through brokers, many of which provide online trading facility to retail customers. Institutional investors can also take advantage of the direct market access (DMA) option, in which they use trading terminals provided by brokers for placing orders directly into the stock market trading system.

Market Indexes

Market Index

The two prominent Indian market indexes are Sensex and Nifty.

Sensex is the oldest market index for equities; it includes shares of 30 firms listed on the BSE, which represent about 45% of the index’s free-float market capitalization.
S&P CNX Nifty; it includes 50 shares listed on the NSE, which represent about 62% of its free-float market capitalization.

About Foreign Investment in India

India started permitting outside investments only in the 1990s. Foreign investments are classified into two categories:

  • Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)
  • Foreign Portfolio Investment (FPI)
FDI # FPI

All investments in which an investor takes part in the day-to-day management and operations of the company, are treated as FDI, whereas investments in shares without any control over management and operations, are treated as FPI.
For making portfolio investment in India, one should be registered either as a foreign institutional investor (FII) or as one of the sub-accounts of one of the registered FIIs. Both registrations are granted by the market regulator, SEBI. Foreign institutional investors mainly consist of mutual funds, pension funds, endowments, sovereign wealth funds, insurance companies, banks, asset management companies etc. At present, India does not allow foreign individuals to invest directly into its stock market. However, high-net-worth individuals (those with a net worth of at least $US50 million) can be registered as sub-accounts of an FII. Foreign institutional investors and their sub accounts can invest directly into any of the stocks listed on any of the stock exchanges. Most portfolio investments consist of investment in securities in the primary and secondary markets, including shares, debentures and warrants of companies listed or to be listed on a recognised stock exchange in India. FIIs can also invest in unlisted securities outside stock exchanges, subject to approval of the price by the Reserve Bank of India. Finally, they can invest in units of mutual funds and derivatives traded on any stock exchange.

Settlement Cycle

Equity spot markets follow a T+2 rolling settlement. This means that any trade taking place on Monday, gets settled by Wednesday. Delivery of shares must be made in dematerialised form, and each exchange has its own clearing house, which assumes all settlement risk, by serving as a central counter party.

Trading Hours

All trading on stock exchanges takes place between 9:55 am and 3:30 pm, Indian Standard Time (+ 5.5 hours GMT), Monday through Friday.

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